Let the Object go!

Storgata 95

17. June 2006 - 15. February 2007

14:21
Mari Hildung

Museums collect objects and the objects’ life stories. Before the object ends up at the museum, it’s had a social life. It’s moved in time and space, perhaps through different ownerships and functions, across borders and between continents. In the museum, the object usually becomes a hostage of history interpretations and the object’s fascinating ambiguity and aesthetic power are tamed.

The objects are transformed into cultural heritage and become representative of values the society holds high. The collections should reflect the traditional North Norwegian lifestyle, be informative and create identity. The museum’s task was to connect the past and the future, to strengthen people’s “collective memory” as a cultural ballast and counterforce to everything new. Just like the big outdoor museums down south, established during the nation building at the turn of the century. In today’s globalised community, the museums’ traditional task is changing.

By focusing on the faithless object, selected objects are presented in an unrestrained way for free association, pure entertainment or perhaps as contributions in an professional debate.